This gorgeous volume is the perfect companion piece to Burnham s Celestial Handbook An Observer s Guide to the Universe Beyond the Solar System In fact, Robert Burnham may have drawn on Allen s work for many of his literary and mythological references.This one volume work, like Burnham s published by Dover it first came out in 1963 is arranged in several sections the introduction an essay on the Solar Zodiac one on the Lunar Zodiac or Houses a complete list of the constellations t This gorgeous volume is the perfect companion piece to Burnham s Celestial Handbook An Observer s Guide to the Universe Beyond the Solar System In fact, Robert Burnham may have drawn on Allen s work for many of his literary and mythological references.This one volume work, like Burnham s published by Dover it first came out in 1963 is arranged in several sections the introduction an essay on the Solar Zodiac one on the Lunar Zodiac or Houses a complete list of the constellations the astronomical version, dividing up the entire sky into sections for easy reference rather than just the Zodiac or the lists of signs used by astrologers in alphabetical order, with all sky objects known at the time listed and described for each constellation a discussion of the Milky Way galaxy and the indices For each major object, including the constellation itselfs as well as the objects found in it, he describes the literary, historical, cultural, and some scientific data associated with it The purely astronomical information he gives on such objects is not nearly as detailed as that given by Burnham s Celestial Guide, and he does not describe deep sky objects requiring telescopes to be observed His interest was in the human side of astronomy down the ages, for almost all of which there were no telescopes.Richard Hinckley Allen 1838, Buffalo, New York 1908, Northampton, Massachusetts was a gifted polymath and amateur naturalist his wide range of interests caused his friends to nickname him the walking encyclopedia His youthful ambition to pursue astronomy was thwarted by poor eyesight, and he became a moderately successful businessman instead He continued in scientific pursuits as a hobby for the rest of his life.Akkeb is best remembered for Star Names Their Lore and Meaning, originally published in 1899 as Star Names and Their Meanings This work was based on his extensive research about the names of the stars and constellations in Arabic, Greco Roman, Chinese, and many other astronomical traditions It is still considered one of the major works on the history of astronomical nomenclature and is often consulted as a resource on star names by amateur if not by professional astronomers I ve heard a few reviewers now claim thatrecent works have superseded Allen monumental achievement Certainly His is dated, and his assessment of Mesopotamian Babylonian constellation names and myths predated the great advances that the early twentieth century brought to our knowledge of those cultures But the work itself is still the definitive study of the subject and the jumping off point for almost all later works touching upon the history and natures of our constellations. Our ultimate horizon, the furthest away from the point of each individual I experience the self is the Starry Firmament of Nuit She is the Divine behind all forms of how human perceived and represented to themselves the Divine, throughout the history of human existence.For, Human as such emerges through this specific relationship, this interaction between an individual soul and the vastness of the clear night sky It s an intimate, personal experience and it s universal, it stands true for e Our ultimate horizon, the furthest away from the point of each individual I experience the self is the Starry Firmament of Nuit She is the Divine behind all forms of how human perceived and represented to themselves the Divine, throughout the history of human existence.For, Human as such emerges through this specific relationship, this interaction between an individual soul and the vastness of the clear night sky It s an intimate, personal experience and it s universal, it stands true for every human being that has ever lived on Earth Astrology, that hidden grandfather of all sciences which in unison with the grandmother, geometry, gave birth to all that we know as Science now , is a form of artful, perfected adoration of Nuit There are patterns that what we do know , and there s the Unknown, and there s the happy unison of the two in astrology The Unknown does not become less ornot known by our knowledge and use of the patterns that astrology reveals the Beauty is in knowing and honoring this, all the while tirelessly calculating, measuring and defining Viewed in this way, all human practices and disciplines that are directly oriented to centered on the stars, are nothing but various elaborations of this same single theme their basic function is to connect the human conscious mind in a structured however narrowly specialized and limited, in some cases way with the Divine They serve to help the mind gap the immeasurable gap between human and God they are various patterns, forms, emerged naturally through the course of experience of human being their perfection is measured by how pure crystal clear is their conductivity This book is a collection of the Names that we have given and that have been recorded , over time, to the naked eye visible individual stars as well as constellations Each name has a lore for each star and constellation seen, human being had weaved a story These stories have come to us from the collective mind of humanity they are structures reflection of motion patterns emerged from the collective Unconscious, crystalized into Words they are hidden hymns of worship, sung by human heart, to the immeasurable Beauty of the vastness of the body of Nuit As such, the book is a small, humble monument of this worship But it s a hidden treasure house a catalog of names that mankind addressed the stars with, throughout history.It is akin to a very long ever tending toward eternity love poem maybe the oldest and longest one there is, and yet a living, breathing poem, whose verses and words are moving, changing places appearing in different context every time, being reflected by a light from a different angle whenever you open the book to look up a star or a constellation And if you vow to always use it along with physically looking up at the night sky instead of only reading the words on paper and or looking at the stars via phone app , I promise it will have many unexpected secrets to teach you This is an astonishing book that I have picked at for years It has a load of information that starts with the aim of explaining where the names of the stars come from but in many ways is a compendium of world mythology, languages, religions and science you can almost trace the development of world civilization by opening it almost anywhere You do have to pick away at it or use it when you want to check a particular item it really is not meant for a straight read The author Allen ties togeth This is an astonishing book that I have picked at for years It has a load of information that starts with the aim of explaining where the names of the stars come from but in many ways is a compendium of world mythology, languages, religions and science you can almost trace the development of world civilization by opening it almost anywhere You do have to pick away at it or use it when you want to check a particular item it really is not meant for a straight read The author Allen ties together so many sources when discussing a constellation and the stars in it that I had to just pause to figure out how he put together all these sources to make a point of information This guy is a pre internet version of Wikipedia and after looking at some of the pages beyond where I wanted find out information and it s hard to just go and find out only what you wanted to read about I often would wonder how I got there just like I feel after cruising the internet for an hour or so I randomly opened to page 264 where he discusses the constellation Lepus He starts with giving the name in several languages then goes into Ancient Greek names, in several dialects no less Then on to the ancient Romans with a quote in Latin, with no translation This book was originally printed in 1899 and I guess that the author would have assumed that anyone who had an interest in this subject had a thorough Classic education with a thorough acquaintance, if not mastery of Latin and Greek Oh, by the way the English usage has a full Edwardian charm to it although sometimes it is a bit pompous I think of this book as a stellar version of the Encyclopaedia Britannica because it ranges so far and sometimes barely keeps to the subject at hand By that I mean that after 2 pages about Lepus he goes into a brief digression about the moon and how various cultures throughout the world and history interpret markings on the lunar surface In one multi punctuated sentence he starts with mention of Sanskrit tales goes on to Aztecs and ends with Japanese This is in the same sentence It seems like he is trying to tell you everything about everything But this book has a lot of fuddy duddy charm He s telling you about a lot of how the peoples of the world looked in amazement at the stars above and I think that he wants us all to still have that amazement in something so seemingly bland as explaining how humans gave names to the stars The basic book of its field, this work covers star names, the zodiac, constellations folklore, and literature associated with heavens This fascinating read is solidly based on years of thorough research into astronomical writings and observations of the ancient Chinese, Arabic, Euphrates, Hellenic, and Roman civilizations Le livre de Richard Hinckley Allen, Star names and their meanings, parut d abord en 1899 Une version corrig e Star names their lore and meaning en a t dit e en 1963 New York et r imprim e depuis Ce copieux volume de xiv 563 pages est le plus complet que je connaisse sur l tymologie des noms d toiles mais il ne dit rien des plan tes C est un dictionnaire class dans l ordre alphab tique des noms latins des constellations, les toiles individuelles tant trait es dans la notice de Le livre de Richard Hinckley Allen, Star names and their meanings, parut d abord en 1899 Une version corrig e Star names their lore and meaning en a t dit e en 1963 New York et r imprim e depuis Ce copieux volume de xiv 563 pages est le plus complet que je connaisse sur l tymologie des noms d toiles mais il ne dit rien des plan tes C est un dictionnaire class dans l ordre alphab tique des noms latins des constellations, les toiles individuelles tant trait es dans la notice de la constellation qui les contient Cette s rie d tudes est pr c d e de trois articles particuliers portant sur le soleil, la lune et la notion de constellation, et suivie d un dernier sur la Galaxie ou Voie Lact e L ouvrage se cl t sur une bibliographie et quatre index un g n ral, un des noms arabes, un des grecs, et m me un des quelques r f rences astronomiques trouv es dans la Bible o , semble t il, les seules figures pr cis ment nomm es sont, comme on pouvait s y attendre, les plus videntes la Grande Ourse, Orion, et l amas des Pl iades cf Job, 9 9, 18 31 32 Amos, 5 8 VIII 1996 A massive compendium of knowledge about the stars and constellations from all over the world It has been the standard reference work for decades but it does show its age in many places The weakest part of the work is its treatment of Mesopotamian sources This is no fault of the author but was due to the fact that the Mesopotamian sources had only just started to be published and were very imperfectly understood I d suspect that his treatment of the star lore of some of the other lesser known A massive compendium of knowledge about the stars and constellations from all over the world It has been the standard reference work for decades but it does show its age in many places The weakest part of the work is its treatment of Mesopotamian sources This is no fault of the author but was due to the fact that the Mesopotamian sources had only just started to be published and were very imperfectly understood I d suspect that his treatment of the star lore of some of the other lesser known cultures would also be prone to the same criticism It could also do with some star maps even a map of the Greek heavens would be useful to help the reader navigate around the book This book is fact filled, well researched, very dense and very dry It s a decent reference book, but I have found a few minor errors, which is worrisome given the avalanche of facts each entry provides about star lore from around the world it would be nice to be able to rely on the researcher It also presumes that the reader is fluent in the Greek alphabet, though this is not a serious hindrance to those who are not It has a general index, a Greek index, and an Arabic index, which is useful This book is fact filled, well researched, very dense and very dry It s a decent reference book, but I have found a few minor errors, which is worrisome given the avalanche of facts each entry provides about star lore from around the world it would be nice to be able to rely on the researcher It also presumes that the reader is fluent in the Greek alphabet, though this is not a serious hindrance to those who are not It has a general index, a Greek index, and an Arabic index, which is useful when looking for a specific star Impossible to get through The information is presented secondarily to the writer s thick and unedited knowledge of lore not seems almostlike an exercise for the author to have shown the fruits of his research than to have created something even moderately intelligible without the reader having to take notes and make references of their own There is a lot of good, interesting information in here, it s just impossible to get at. Wonderful, used it as a reference guide when talking about stars to groups.