Confessio Amantis The Lover s Confession is a , line Middle English poem by John Gower, which uses the confession made by an ageing lover to the chaplain of Venus as a frame story for a collection of shorter narrative poems According to its prologue, it was composed at the request of Richard II It stands with the works of Chaucer, Langland, and the Pearl poet as one of the great works of late th century English literature The Index of Middle English Verse shows that in the era before the printing press it was one of the most often copied manuscriptscopies along with Canterbury Talescopies and Piers PlowmancopiesIn genre it is usually considered a poem of consolation, a medieval form inspired by Boethius Consolation of Philosophy and typified by works such as Pearl Despite this, it is usually studied alongside other tale collections with similar structures, such as the Decameron of Boccaccio, and particularly Chaucer s Canterbury Tales, with which the Confessio has several stories in common Wikipedia


10 thoughts on “Confessio Amantis, Volume 1

  1. Kim Zarins Kim Zarins says:

    Gower rules If you love couplets and twists on Ovidian tales, look no farther If you are a non academic reader, maybe start by reading individual stories side by side with Ovid or Chaucer to appreciate how he shifts meanings in the old stories I don t normally rate medieval books that are normally read only by an academic audience, but this is Gower, so I m pleased to promote him He deserves a wider readership.


  2. Katie Katie says:

    Middle English is hard, but I think Gower s writing makes it a little easier Confessio Amantis is sort of fun, for all the struggle it takes to read it I really enjoy the many stories it contains, and the dynamic ways Gower deals with the 7 sins Today, we ve boiled the sins down to simple concepts The sins weren t like that in Gower s time, so it s refreshing to read about how meaningful and deep sins and virtues were for these people.


  3. Tanner Tanner says:

    Striking, truly This was the book that nearly converted a 20th century Brit Irish literature student to a Medievalist I did not take the time I needed to process the prologue, book 1, and book 8, but what I did understand was profoundly creative.


  4. Highlyeccentric Highlyeccentric says:

    I ve only read book 8 at this stage, and my grand conclusion is I need to read .


  5. Lesliemae Lesliemae says:

    Might moral Gower really be refashioned into the kind of chivalric lover that the Confessio suggests In a brilliant reversal in the end vision of the Confessio Amantis, what the reader at first thought was primarily the education and moral mental regulating of chivalric romance in light of christian charity turns on its heel and asks what creative beauty has in common with divine beauty Be warned this work requires a holy mythic juggernaut of energy to blast through It s worth it in the e Might moral Gower really be refashioned into the kind of chivalric lover that the Confessio suggests In a brilliant reversal in the end vision of the Confessio Amantis, what the reader at first thought was primarily the education and moral mental regulating of chivalric romance in light of christian charity turns on its heel and asks what creative beauty has in common with divine beauty Be warned this work requires a holy mythic juggernaut of energy to blast through It s worth it in the end, however


  6. Fr. Peter Mottola Fr. Peter Mottola says:

    This very helpfully glossed Middle English text is readable even for those who have no formal training in Middle English The work itself contains myriad fascinating moral examples drawn from a wide variety of biblical and classical stories I have found herein many great illustrations that can be used well in preaching, as the images are powerful and difficult to forget.If you enjoyed the Consolation of Philosophy of Boethius, this may be right up your alley.


  7. Grétar Grétar says:

    A quite long didactic poem At least the prologue and the epilogue are essential read for any fourteenth century enthusiast


  8. Abby Ang Abby Ang says:

    ugh


  9. Amanda Amanda says:

    Not one of my favorite medieval texts but the idealized description of the 3 estates model in book 1 is an interesting perspective.


  10. Kelly A. Kelly A. says:

    I CAN T rate this, I CAN T