World s End is the story of Donald Wheal s childhood in Chelsea s World s End at the height of the Second World WarNot for him the privileged bohemian world of Chelsea a few hundred yards away Descended from rural immigrants, ladies of the night and bare knuckle fighters, Donald Wheal s upbringing took place amidst grimy factories and generating plants, illegal street bookmakers, dog tracks, tenements and street walkers who plied their trade in Piccadilly and Soho World s End is the story of how he and his family struggled free from this underclass It is also an individual history of the Second World War, of a small boy s grappling with the bitter separation of evacuation, the return to an already battered London, the wonderland of bomb damaged houses to play in, and the nights of terror as the Blitz returned


10 thoughts on “World's End

  1. Meredith Meredith says:

    This is an incredible memoir.It is at once deeply hilarious, touching, informative and unique It is worth reading if only to get a window into Chelsea slums during WWII language, culture, routine, work, etc The author s family is interesting and diverse with elements that even the author admits he has never quite understood In short, this is the exactly the sort of person who should write a memoir and on top of that it is written extremely well.I highly recommend to audio version as the r This is an incredible memoir.It is at once deeply hilarious, touching, informative and unique It is worth reading if only to get a window into Chelsea slums during WWII language, culture, routine, work, etc The author s family is interesting and diverse with elements that even the author admits he has never quite understood In short, this is the exactly the sort of person who should write a memoir and on top of that it is written extremely well.I highly recommend to audio version as the reader is absolutely perfect and gives the book the tone it deserves and requires


  2. Jill Jill says:

    Really enjoyed this and it spurred my interest in parts of London I never knew


  3. Robert Bolton Robert Bolton says:

    I loved this book It s a perfect memoir of life in the ninteen thirties and forties through the eyes of an intelligent, sensitive and fully aware child living in a virtual London slum but supporrted by a loving, intelligent and hard working family And the late writer s description of the blitz as it directly affected him, his family, friends and neighbours, isevocative than any official history Next I have to read his follow up memoir White City.


  4. Shonna Froebel Shonna Froebel says:

    Very engaging memoir from a poor neighbourhood.


  5. Veronica Veronica says:

    reminded me of The Book Thief, but with lots of stories