Sateenkaarinotkon lapset ovat kasvaneet, sodan uhka on ilmassa ja pian pojat joutuvatkin rintamalle yksi toisensa j lkeen Kotijoukkoja j johtamaan Rilla, josta on varttunut upea, vahva nuori nainen aivan kuin itins AnnaTapaamme Sateenkaarinotkosta tutun Kotikunnaan v en sodan kynnyksell Rillan veljet ja yst v t l htev t rintamalle ja tytt itse saa hoidettavakseen iditt m n orpolapsen Seuraavat vuodet tuovat Rillalle niin ilon kuin kyyneltenkin aiheita Turhamaisesta villikosta kasvaa vastuuntuntoinen, upea nuori nainen, ilmiselv sti Anna itins tyt r


10 thoughts on “Kotikunnaan Rilla

  1. Maria Maria says:

    Is it Rilla my Rilla Yeth.


  2. Kate Kate says:

    This is the final book of the Anne series, and deals with the lives of her children While it s wonderful to see characters evolve into adulthood and have a next generation come to life, the real strength of this book is it s window into the homeland society of rural Maritime Canada during the first World War It s one of few documentations even if the characters are fictional of what women were doing at home during the war, and this setting breathes new life into the end of the series The se This is the final book of the Anne series, and deals with the lives of her children While it s wonderful to see characters evolve into adulthood and have a next generation come to life, the real strength of this book is it s window into the homeland society of rural Maritime Canada during the first World War It s one of few documentations even if the characters are fictional of what women were doing at home during the war, and this setting breathes new life into the end of the series The setting also allows Montgomery to challenge readers with darker elements that are often present but less overt in other books Rilla, Anne s youngest daughter, is a wonderful, spirited character and one of my favorites In general, Montgomery s work is constantly under estimated, and the way the books are marketed doesn t help the flowery script, the swoony illustrations There are many layers at work in her stories, and some pioneering feminist concepts tucked in between the deep appreciation of nature, the commentary on the stuffy contemporary society of her day, and the delightful, well drawn characters


  3. Lindsay Lindsay says:

    This is the book that finally severed my relationship with Kevin Sullivan When Anne of Green Gables The Continuing Story premiered in the early 2000s, I was shocked to discover that Anne and Gilbert were suddenly time warped to WWI That s wrong On so many levels.WWI wasn t Anne s war, it was Rilla s, and Ken s, and Walter s, and that damn dog who turns me into a gushy mess every freaking time I read the last chapter Rilla the youngest child of Anne and Gilbert is fifteen see what I m This is the book that finally severed my relationship with Kevin Sullivan When Anne of Green Gables The Continuing Story premiered in the early 2000s, I was shocked to discover that Anne and Gilbert were suddenly time warped to WWI That s wrong On so many levels.WWI wasn t Anne s war, it was Rilla s, and Ken s, and Walter s, and that damn dog who turns me into a gushy mess every freaking time I read the last chapter Rilla the youngest child of Anne and Gilbert is fifteen see what I mean about the time warp and desperately in love with the boy next door When the world around her crashes and she s forced to grow up quickly, her journey is just as enjoyable as her mother s was in the first three books The difference is, this is a mature kind of love Though I devoured the entire series as a seven year old,Rilla of Inglesideis the one that I ve worn through with repeated readings as an adult Simply put, it s perfection.The fact that Kevin Sullivan clearly ignored the fact that this book was written at all is frustrating and, to a reader who considers this book one of the reasons she became a romance writer, downright cruel


  4. Duane Duane says:

    I have now read all eight books in the Anne of Green Gables series Eight books that were an absolute pleasure to read I like this one almost as much as the 1st one It s the story of Anne s daughter Rilla, but it is set with the backdrop of World War I which has a huge influence on Anne s family This story has aserious tone than the other books but it is a fitting conclusion to a wonderful story.


  5. Ahmad Sharabiani Ahmad Sharabiani says:

    Rilla of Ingleside Anne of Green Gables 8 , L.M MontgomeryRilla of Ingleside 1921 is the eighth of nine books in the Anne of Green Gables series by Lucy Maud Montgomery, but was the sixth Anne novel in publication order This book draws the focus back onto a single character, Anne and Gilbert s youngest daughter Bertha Marilla Rilla Blythe It has aserious tone, as it takes place during World War I and the three Blythe boys Jem, Walter, and Shirley, along with Rilla s sweetheart Rilla of Ingleside Anne of Green Gables 8 , L.M MontgomeryRilla of Ingleside 1921 is the eighth of nine books in the Anne of Green Gables series by Lucy Maud Montgomery, but was the sixth Anne novel in publication order This book draws the focus back onto a single character, Anne and Gilbert s youngest daughter Bertha Marilla Rilla Blythe It has aserious tone, as it takes place during World War I and the three Blythe boys Jem, Walter, and Shirley, along with Rilla s sweetheart Ken Ford, and playmates Jerry Meredith and Carl Meredith, end up fighting in Europe with the Canadian Expeditionary Force 2012 1386 480 1388 1392 9789645361950 20


  6. Kelly Kelly says:

    This is probably my favorite of the Anne books I love watching Rilla mature into a young woman, and I think the romance betwen Rilla and Ken Ford is one of the best in kidlit.


  7. Victoria Lynn Victoria Lynn says:

    Now, I loved Anne Don t get me wrong, but this book was on another whole level I ADORED It The heartbreak of ww1, the grown up Blythe family I just loved everything about it.


  8. E.F.B. E.F.B. says:

    I started reading the Anne of Green Gables series for the first time in late 2016 Slowly, but surely, I made my way through I liked some of the books and loved others, but none of them ever quite match the first book, which remained my favorite of them all Then, along came Rilla I knew from certain Goodreads friends that it was different from the rest of the books because it s focus is on Anne s daughter rather than Anne herself What I didn t realize was how very emotional it would be in a I started reading the Anne of Green Gables series for the first time in late 2016 Slowly, but surely, I made my way through I liked some of the books and loved others, but none of them ever quite match the first book, which remained my favorite of them all Then, along came Rilla I knew from certain Goodreads friends that it was different from the rest of the books because it s focus is on Anne s daughter rather than Anne herself What I didn t realize was how very emotional it would be in a good way, actually , because, as the book begins, they are approaching the beginning of WWI The Great War In all the previous Anne books, I discovered that there was literally ALWAYS one thing in every book sad enough to make me cry, and I had to learn to brace for it List of some spoilery sad things, just because view spoiler Matthew dying, Anne sitting at Ruby Gillis bedside and talking about heaven with her as she was dying of consumption, that poor little boy of whom Anne and her friend took a picture and he later died his dying words to his father were what got me Wah , Anne s first baby dying, Captain Jim dying, etc, etc hide spoiler But this was not the case with Rilla Oh, no With Rilla, I WAS CRYING THROUGH THE WHOLE THING I m not joking, while there were some lighter hearted chapters thrown in here and there, in general I could barely get through a single chapter without tearing up at least a little, just from the knowledge of how horrible that time in history was, not to mention seeing what it was like for the characters to live during that time which I m sure was extremely realistic given that L M Montgomery lived through that time herself , having loved ones going and fighting, not knowing what would happen to them, much less what would happen to the world by the end of the conflict, and being afraid with every phone call that you would be told your loved one wasn t coming back This is actually why it took me a full month just to read this book My main daily reading time is right before bed, but fear of death, actual death, and world war, do not good bedtime reading make, no matter how redemptively the author handles it It was making me so emotional, I was having trouble sleeping afterwards, and so had to relegate it to daytime reading only Unfortunately, I don t often get long periods of daytime reading, thus the slow progress I just wanted to clarify that so no future readers of this review who didn t see my updates while I read think I took so long because I wasn t enjoying it, or that it was a difficult read, because I very much did enjoy it, and it was nodifficult to read than the rest of the Anne books In fact, I d say it had a lot fewer superfluous scenes in it than some of the other Anne books did, and I don t remember skimming at all Had I been on my normal reading schedule, I probably would have had it finished in under two weeks That said, I ll get on to the things I liked and disliked Dislikes Not much, and the things I did dislike werepersonal nit picks than anything that took away from my reading experience, but I will mention them for the sake of balance There was one girl Rilla knew who was a major jerk The type that, if you re friends with her, everything s fine and dandy, but get on her bad side and she ll treat you badly and try to get everyone else to turn against you, too Thankfully, she didn t feature much, but I was extremely annoyed when she view spoiler told Rilla, right before the concert, that Walter had enlisted, and also tried to make it seem like he had specifically confided in her instead of Rilla She did this specifically to upset Rilla so she wouldn t do well in the concert, hide spoiler and I just thought that was the meanest thing The only other things I can think of is that I did sometimes miss getting Anne s perspective on things We got glimpses of it here and there, but didn t spend near as much time in her point of view as we did in other books Speaking of missing things, I have felt at times that Montgomery had Anne and Gilbert have a fewkids than she, the author, maybe should have On one hand, she did manage to have the all the children, and many other characters represented at least a little throughout the course of the book On the other hand, half the Blythe kids got WAYcharacterization than the others Nan and Di especially seemed to just be set dressing in this one They were off at school most of the time, and even when they were home, they didn t do much Shirley got a bitto do in this book than the last two I honestly forgot he existed at times, in the last two books , but I never developed any particular attachment to him because all I knew about him was that Susan felt like a mother to him because she d had to do so much for him when he was first born because Anne got so sick Then, the only thing I learned about him in this book was that he felt duty bound to join the war and fly air planes That s kinda it Had he died I would have been slightly sad for his family s sake, but I can t say I would have shed tears Sorry, Shirley Likes Pretty much everything else While I did miss Anne s perspective, this is a children s series, and I understand why Montgomery wanted to focus on the kids again In this case, Rilla was the baby of the family and had the most growing to do, so I felt that she was a great narrator to choose She was so frivolous and silly at the beginning of the book and it was wonderful to see her mature and grow so much, but also never become embittered She was stronger than even she thought she was and rose to the challenges of life again and again Rilla and Ken Need I saySo sweet, so innocent, and it was so cute how Rilla s lisp would come back around Ken, which just made themadorable, especially in that very last scene 3 Susan Susan was such a brick as they called her in the book, and that s a good thing So strong through all of it, running up the flag after every victory, yelling at the Kaiser as if he could actually hear her I think the family was right when they thought, if the Germans made it to Canada, Susan would face them all down and win XD Such a wonderful lady who helped keep their spirits lifted through it all The family dynamics I ve always loved Anne and Gilbert s family, even if all the kids weren t characterized equally Anne and Gilbert still love each other and seem to have a stable marriage in their 50 s, and they and the kids all love and support each other Anne and Gilbert never stopped their children from doing the things they felt they needed to do, namely going to fight in the war and helping with the war effort, even when it meant a personal sacrifice for them I also appreciated how Gilbert handled Rilla bringing her war baby home He didn t want the baby to just get shoved off and Anne and Susan, so he challenged Rilla to either take care of it herself or agree to send it to the asylum, all the while knowing that the baby would stay there at Ingleside no matter what, but also knowing that Rilla needed this opportunity to take responsibility and grow from it Then there was Rilla and Walter s relationship, which was so wonderful I love seeing close sibling relationships in books, especially brother sister, and Rilla s love for, and confidence in Walter, and the way they confided in each other was so sweet And then the letter Walter wrote to Rilla before before well, you know before what, if you ve read the book, and I won t spoil you if you haven t yet But, the fact that Walter knew what was coming and that he took the time to send Rilla his love and encourage her to keep fighting no matter what eyes watering Oh, Walter Dog Monday WAH So many tears caused by him So many poignant moments made evenpoignant because of his loyalty in waiting at the train station, and especially how he knew when view spoiler Walter was gone, and howled all night, mourning him before the family ever got the news hide spoiler cries just thinking about it Not going to get over that any time soon And then the beauty when he was reunited with his best friend again and andtears The analogy of the Pied Piper s song being the irresistible call to war Oh boy, did Montgomery ever use that one masterfully The use of that as foreshadowing in the previous book just made it hit home that much harder in this book, and it was so painful, and yet so beautiful and perfect I already had great respect for those who fight for good in the armed forces around the world, and this book only served to deepen that respect To quote the book, Let us drink to the silent army to the boys and these days, the women, too who followed when the Piper summoned For our tomorrow they gave their today theirs is the victory The faith element, again, was present and well used Even though they at times had doubts, the family kept their faith in God through the whole war, knowing that good would overcome evil, even when it didn t happen as quickly as they hoped, and Montgomery used this very well to show where the hand of God was at work during the war To quote Mr Meredith, I truly do believe there were times when God said to the enemy, This far No farther And I believe He continues to do that in many conflicts, both global and personal Gertrude Oliver s vivid prediction dreams, while not an element I expected Montgomery to use, especially as even the Blythe family didn t believe in them at first, provided further spiritual depth and poignancy to certain happenings The way she dreamed before the war started that there was a tide of blood coming that could not be held back The time when it was feared that that vital city in France would fall, but she dreamed that even in the midsts of the raging storm, there was the French soldier standing strong against the tide and saying, They will not pass And finally, when she dreamed the tide was receding, and the sun would shine again All so beautiful, so poignant, and all provided some of the most vivid mental images for me while reading the book This depth of emotion is the biggest reason why Rilla of Ingleside is now tied with Anne of Green Gables as my favorite of the series I can t claim it s overtaken Anne simply from the standpoint that they are such different books, set in such different times in world history, and I truly love them both, just for totally different reasons I love Anne for its hope, innocence, and determination to find beauty even in the midst of tough circumstances, and I love Rilla for its depth, faith, and a different kind of hope One that has been through the fire and come out the other side, not untouched, but still strengthened because of what it s been through Those are values that mean something to me personally, and for that reason, I am glad to have finally read these books, and will cherish them always.Content advisory for those who want to know Due to the heavy themes of world war and personal loss in this book, I would recommend it for readers 12 and up unless, perhaps, a younger reader is particularly mature and not easily upset by such things Violence The horrors of war are a big part of this story, but are never described graphically We only read brief mentions of injury, such as someone was shot in the leg, someone was knocked out by an exploding shell, someone was killed instantly by a bullet, etc We also read brief mention of how innocent women and children were starving and or were killed in the war, and how prisoners of war were treated badly, but again, the treatment is not described One character has a dream in which a tide covers the entirety of the land where she live and when it reaches her doorstep, the hem of her dress is soaked with blood She later has another dream in which she is standing side by side with a French soldier who has a bloody wound in his shoulder, but this wound is not described anythan what I just wrote.Swearing After hearing news about the killing of women and children overseas, Walter cries out, Oh God, no several times In the context I wasn t sure if he was actually crying out to God, or if he was using the Lord s name in vain.Other than that, the only other swearing is the use of darn and darned which Susan considers swears Miss Oliver also threatens to swear, wondering if it would help her feel better when she gets so upset over the war news, and several times says something along the lines of, But don t you think it would feel good just to say d and then Susan cuts her off before she can say whatever word was intended.Romantic content Nothing sexual to be found here Only a mild, chaste romance between Rilla and her sweetheart and, one undescribed kiss between them, and a promise that she won t kiss anyone else while he s gone, to which she remains true


  9. Manybooks Manybooks says:

    Now I do know and realise that I am probably going to be seriously offending and angering some if not even rather many readers and likely alsothan a number of Goodreads friends when I state that I absolutely and utterly despise L.M Montgomery s Rilla of Ingleside and quite with every fibre of my being For while, yes indeed, I do well know that the novel was written not only about WWI but also basically immediately post WWI and that it is and should therefore be considered an object Now I do know and realise that I am probably going to be seriously offending and angering some if not even rather many readers and likely alsothan a number of Goodreads friends when I state that I absolutely and utterly despise L.M Montgomery s Rilla of Ingleside and quite with every fibre of my being For while, yes indeed, I do well know that the novel was written not only about WWI but also basically immediately post WWI and that it is and should therefore be considered an object a piece of fiction of its time and place with its blatant anti German sentiment and ultra nationalism, as a person of German background who has for one often been bullied and harassed because of her ethnicity and who has for two also read a goodly number of both British and German WWI novels that while definitely overly nationalistic were are still not only and simply diatribes of ethnic and cultural intolerance, I really and truly emotionally, personally cannot in any way stand and accept in particular the bigotry and racism against anything even remotely German shown and presented in Rilla of Ingleside by the Blythe Family housekeeper Susan Baker and actually eventhat there is NEVER really ANY type of actual criticism of Susan Baker and her radical hatreds by the author, by Lucy Maud Montgomery, which sadly and frustratingly does make me think that the former, that Susan Baker as a character is likely very much a mirror image of L.M Montgomery and her own perceptions and attitudes And sorry, but actually no, I guess I am not really all that sorry and do stand by my attitude of anger but whenever I do read or try to read Rilla of Ingleside, although the novel is definitely emotionally charged, well written and yes definitely tugs at one s heart especially with regard to Walter Blythe s death in combat and how this affects everyone, emotionally and very much personally, I indeed consider Rilla of Ingleside in many ways, in most ways quite as racist and as nastily intolerant as Montgomery s anti Native Canadian short story, as her anti First Nations ranting tirade of Tannis of the Flats which is one of the only L.M Montgomery pieces of short fiction that I have absolutely and viscerally hated and which I also generally skip when rereading the author s Further Chronicles of Avonlea And finally, while I would NOT go so far as to not recommend Rilla of Ingleside, I do leave the I believe necessary caveat that in my humble opinion, the ber nationalistic tendencies of the novel and especially the casual acceptance of this by almost everyone, including the author, including L.M Montgomery herself do need to be discussed and indeed also condemned As honestly, especially Susan Baker, she uses throughout Rilla of Ingleside quite the SAME type of rhetoric against ALL Germans that the Nazis just a decade or so later were using against Jews, against Gypsies, basically against anyone not German, and I for one do find this both troubling and offensive especially since not only the majority of reviewers but sadly also far far too many academic analyses of Rilla of Ingleside seem either completely and blissfully unaware of or would rather ignore and not consider this to be a potential and possible problem and issue So therefore, while I do from a stylistic point of view and departure and also I guess to a certain extent from a historic realism point of view both accept and even grudgingly commend L.M Montgomery for having with her Rilla of Ingleside penned a both sadly emotional and often beautiful story of love, loss and the home front, I still cannot and will not givethan one star to a novel that is basically full to the proverbial rim with vile hatred and nastiness towards and for me simply because of my ethnicity and background as a German, and especially since Rilla of Ingleside is or at least seems so universally loved and considered acceptable in every way but honestly and in my own and humble opinion, if or when those readers who absolutely adore Rilla of Ingleside were to peruse a German WWI account with even just some minor and slight vestiges of that same bigotry, nationalism and racial anger presented and featured, they wouldthan likely lift their heads and rightfully, with justification collectively howl in and with angry protest, even as Rilla of Ingleside and especially Susan Baker s uncritically and even by L.M Montgomery generally positively shown and depicted viciousness and angry outbursts against anything and anyone even remotely German seem totally alright to and for them


  10. Melki Melki says:

    Before this war is over, he said or something said through his lips every man and woman and child in Canada will feel it you, Mary, will feel it feel it to your heart s core You will weep tears of blood over it The Piper has come and he will pipe until every corner of the world has heard his awful and irresistible music It will be years before the dance of death is over years, Mary And in those years millions of hearts will break At first, everyone isconcerned with loca Before this war is over, he said or something said through his lips every man and woman and child in Canada will feel it you, Mary, will feel it feel it to your heart s core You will weep tears of blood over it The Piper has come and he will pipe until every corner of the world has heard his awful and irresistible music It will be years before the dance of death is over years, Mary And in those years millions of hearts will break At first, everyone isconcerned with local gossip than the fact that some Archduke Ferdinand or other has been assassinated in a place called Sarajevo, but soon the affairs of the world have intruded into the quiet, peaceful village of Glen St Mary England declared war on Germany today, said Jack Elliot slowly The news came by wire just as I left town And before longThey are calling for volunteers in town, father, said Jem Scores have joined up already I m going in tonight to enlist Anne can do little but watch as her oldest son goes to war I am determined that I will send my boy off tomorrow with a smile He shall not carry away with him the remembrance of a weak mother who had not the courage to send when he had the courage to go And, so the womenfolk put on their brave faces, and begin their busy vigil There are socks to knit, hastily arranged marriages to plan, and war babies to care for Rilla, Anne s youngest child, grows from a rather spoiled fifteen year old into a caring and responsible young woman Our sacrifice is greater than his, cried Rilla passionately Our boys give only themselves We give them Then Gilbert relates the devastating news that changes so many lives forever .I enjoyed this visit into Anne s world, though there is an incident of religious nutjobbery view spoiler A young boy drowns his kitten in the hopes that his sacrifice will make God bring Jem back home safely Shudder But, everyone in the novel seems to think it s a touching gesture hide spoiler that I found rather disturbing, and must have managed to block out the other two times I read this book Thankfully, Little Dog Monday, with his devoted Greyfriar s Bobby stunt, makes up for this, and his story made me sob yet again This is a wonderful culmination to the series It is an ending, yes, but somehow Montgomery leaves us feeling that life will go on for this family, even though we no longer get to be a part of it