I received my copy from the generous author Thank you In the preface to Sailors of Stonehenge , Manuel Vega is emphatic that this book is not, nor is it intended to be, a scientific work That said, a beginning understanding of astronomy or a reference source such as a library book or the internet will, I think, make reading this bookrewarding I was fortunate to have some exposure to astronomy in high school and college, and I believe it helped me to really appreciate what the author is I received my copy from the generous author Thank you In the preface to Sailors of Stonehenge , Manuel Vega is emphatic that this book is not, nor is it intended to be, a scientific work That said, a beginning understanding of astronomy or a reference source such as a library book or the internet will, I think, make reading this bookrewarding I was fortunate to have some exposure to astronomy in high school and college, and I believe it helped me to really appreciate what the author is attempting to relate regarding the Megalith Builders and what he and others believe they were able to accomplish in prehistoric times I particularly was struck by the material in Chapter 10.As Adrienne Mayor writes in her book The First Fossil Hunters Dinosaurs, Mammoths, and Myth in Greek and Roman Times , the myths and legends of giants, griffins, dragons, etc., from ancient Greece and the Romans may actually be attempts to explain the huge fossilized bones found during their journeys Manuel Vega convincingly, I think, is able to relate certain myths, as mentioned in other reviews, to the activities of the Megalith Builders.Bringing the heavens down to earth is a central theme of the book Planetary gears, gears that mimic the revolutions and the interconnectedness of the Sun and the planets, are a technology that has been in use since the 1500 s It is a technology that had to be rediscovered from the ancients Similarly, Manuel Vega cites several examples of Megalithic construction, rituals, and science that were rediscovered and sometimes credited to later civilizations This is another important idea from the author and others the Megalith Builders were not just a loose scattering of groups that had limited interactions and exchanges of technologies, but were a scientifically,politically and spiritually sophisticated civilization advanced mariners, competent astronomers and prodigious builders divided into kingdoms.This is not a book that you have to agree or disagree with, just entertain the possibility this could have been what the Megalithic Builders were like We don t have the luxury of examining written material, and many of their important centers have been in continuous habitation for thousands of years with any evidence of the Builders presence long lost or re purposed I look forward to the book on the Megalith Builders voyage around the world as mentioned on page 83.Enjoy I entered the competition to win a copy of this book because I have always been interested in alternative history and astroarchaeology, and this seemed like something right up my street It was only after I won a copy that I had a bit of a panic, because I realised then that I would have to write a review of it Now, I do write reviews of other books that I read, but they are ratherfor myself than from any expectation that other people would read them Here though, the author was offering I entered the competition to win a copy of this book because I have always been interested in alternative history and astroarchaeology, and this seemed like something right up my street It was only after I won a copy that I had a bit of a panic, because I realised then that I would have to write a review of it Now, I do write reviews of other books that I read, but they are ratherfor myself than from any expectation that other people would read them Here though, the author was offering a copy of his book because he wanted people to review it and bring it to the attention of others This was difficult for me what if the book was a turgid piece of rubbish and I hated it Well, it wasn t and I didn t Though I didn t love it enough to give itthan 3 stars for the reasons I am about to give.What we got was an intriguing and entertaining what if story The author quite sensibly knows that he cannot prove any of what he is speculating about because it is dealing with things that leave no trace, such as the states of minds of ancient peoples He quite rightly uses the word hypothesis in it s correct scientific meaning as he sets up his story through the first half of the book Unfortunately, the author started to lose me in the second half of the book, as he takes what he set up in part 1 and veers off to wildly improbable conclusions This is a common fault in many of the alternative history books that I have read I have read and forgotten at least as many books as I have listed here an author will take points A,B and C and turn them into point Z without any basis of evidence or by going through points D to Y My liking of the book reached its nadir with the throwaway line about megalithic builders taking round the world voyages on the basis of a few petroglyph s of boats The what if element takes a back seat in this part of the book, to the detriment of the story being told The author instead seems to almost present this section of the story as fact, and there were facts in here that I simply could not believe in The foundation that was set up in part 1 of the book simply wasn t strong enough to support the castle that was build on top of it in part 2.The author manages to drag things back right at the end with some intriguing ideas about Atlantis, and I really wish that he had spent a little bittime on this part instead of just a few pages at the very end, because I could actually believe that the myth of Atlantis had some basis in the megalith builders of Western Europe It was too little, too late though At the end of the day, the success or otherwise of a book like this is based on whether or not the author can convince you of the validity of the scenario that is presented to you, and I simply was not convinced enough In that regard, the book must be seen as failure, at least in part I say in part because at least he does not fall into the other traps that authors of alternative history do, such as claiming that proof of their theory is just around the corner in which case, why not wait to get that proof before you publish , or better still, start screaming conspiracy because someone in authority won t let them dig up their proof as if every person with a theory would be allowed to dig up some of the most important archaeological sites in the world.I think with a little work, this book could be really great It s a miss, but a close one and I am glad that I had a chance to read it despite my misgivings I really did enjoy quite a lot of the book even the technical parts , and at less than 150 pages, it doesn t outstay it s welcome One quick note about the language it seems clear to me that this book was originally written in Spanish and then translated into English afterwards Whilst the translation is good, it isn t perfect and there are numerous occasions when the wrong word is used The errors are mostly minor and you can always get the gist of what the author is intending to say, but when you see such errors, it tends to pull you out of the narrative flow It would be a relatively easy matter to correct these mistakes and it would improve the book As I always say, I got this book for free The author was kind enough to send me a copy in exchange for a bit of editing While doing my assigned pages I also perused the rest of the book for the purposes of reviewing Despite that very kind consideration by the author I give my candid feedback below.Many times when reading a book one can t help but wish you could tinker with it a bit This book has a lot of really good qualities that make it a fine reference for Neolithic stonework The author As I always say, I got this book for free The author was kind enough to send me a copy in exchange for a bit of editing While doing my assigned pages I also perused the rest of the book for the purposes of reviewing Despite that very kind consideration by the author I give my candid feedback below.Many times when reading a book one can t help but wish you could tinker with it a bit This book has a lot of really good qualities that make it a fine reference for Neolithic stonework The author has really done his homework and obviously knows what he s talking about Textually it is a bit rough but that can be cleared up with some editing which is currently underway It s a good textbook, though a bit on the dry side.One thing that strikes me particularly about it though is that unlike most textbooks it s not afraid to reach a bit for hypotheses While the author is clearly well informed in his field, I would suspect that some of his conclusions are rather far afield for the traditional academic community Any rigorous and detailed scrutiny of his conclusions is likely to draw some barbs from his peers Even the reviewers here, who one assumes are not paleontologists for the most part, seem to question the linearity of his arguments.All THAT said, I think there s a germ of a book here that might just sell a few thousand copies While academia isn t likely to line up around the block for a copy, there is an entire reading subculture that practically begs for information like this Given some editing, a larger format, some good color photos and proper marketing, there are a lot of people who would buy a book linking Stonehenge and other ancient monument sites with the lost city of Atlantis and Greek literature The fact that author is a credible researcher in this area is a powerful thing and there are plenty of people who would adore a book on speculative human history from such a studied and legitimate source At any rate, take all that with a grain of salt This book is a very educated view on an interesting topic that most people don t know much about I was glad to have the chance to edit and review it Sailors of StonehengeBy Manuel Vega Independent PublisherAugust 31, 2012ISBN 1479169234 9781479169238166 pages5 StarsThis is a must have book for any person or student with innate interest in history, anthropology, mythology, or the celestial and Atlantic origins Sailors of Stonehenge could act as a standalone college history course Society has long been intrigued with the various historical monuments such as Stonehenge, Avebury, and Carnac and as technology advances some light is being sh Sailors of StonehengeBy Manuel Vega Independent PublisherAugust 31, 2012ISBN 1479169234 9781479169238166 pages5 StarsThis is a must have book for any person or student with innate interest in history, anthropology, mythology, or the celestial and Atlantic origins Sailors of Stonehenge could act as a standalone college history course Society has long been intrigued with the various historical monuments such as Stonehenge, Avebury, and Carnac and as technology advances some light is being shed upon these mysteries and altering history as we know it This book dives into the some of the world s oldest mysteries where Vega has spent a lot of time piecing the science with the stories and creating a well grounded theory as to who, what, and how these megathilic masterpieces were created and why and the importance of archeoastronomy utilized by these civilizationsVega s writing is anything but dull, packing this quick yet powerful read with a virtual array of maps, pictures, and various other forms of visual aids to grasp the reader and pull them in, leaving them longing forHis style of writing is refreshing, keeping the pace moving steadily and providing just enough information on each topic to understand the basis for even those readers lacking background knowledge I truly look forward to any future writings Mr Vega publishes and can t wait to utilize this piece in my own Master s studies I loved visiting the megalithic stones and standing stone circles Druid Circles on the western coast of Ireland My reasoning for visiting them was simply personal, perhaps because I love antiques and the stones are about as old as you can get, and also because I loved Diane Gibaldon s 1st book, The Outlanders and subsequently the series which was based on similar old stones Now after reading Vega s book, I wish I had also visited Newgrange while in Ireland I ve also always wanted to vis I loved visiting the megalithic stones and standing stone circles Druid Circles on the western coast of Ireland My reasoning for visiting them was simply personal, perhaps because I love antiques and the stones are about as old as you can get, and also because I loved Diane Gibaldon s 1st book, The Outlanders and subsequently the series which was based on similar old stones Now after reading Vega s book, I wish I had also visited Newgrange while in Ireland I ve also always wanted to visit Stonehenge in Great Britain What about Easter Island After reading this book, I really want to go Vega details very researched material which aligns the megalithic stone placements with the stars He likens the earth as the mirror reflection of the sky The people who placed the stones did so to mirror the galaxies As the axis altered, so did the need to alter the stones hence, the need to get in boats and travel the seas to new lands In order to travel the seas, the megalithic period man would have had to be very good sailors One can t help thinking about these sailors Were they so intellectually bright that they could sail the seas, mirroring life on earth to the galaxies Was man then transformed into the religious era people, and is man now evolving into the spiritual age This is all so very important for understanding the past for the past helps us to decipher the present Thousands of years were spent replicating the galaxies Thousands of years have been spent in make believe What is next Much of this book was way over my head I never really studied the zodiac except to learn my own sign I can barely discern the star formations, although I can find the big and little dippers.that s about it The read is interesting and the life of the people who traveled to and from these formations was thought provoking Could it all be Who knows for sure, but I do believe that anything is possible there s an edit, just below the main review, noted with an asterisk I won this book at a first reads competition As many of you know, it has a variety of books that are of diverse genres I usually read anything fiction related, but this one caught my eye because it seemed to be a mixture of pre history, archaeology, astronomy and myths, all of which make me delve into them and want to explore their mysteries The genre here is unspecified The author himself says so at the preface It is neit there s an edit, just below the main review, noted with an asterisk I won this book at a first reads competition As many of you know, it has a variety of books that are of diverse genres I usually read anything fiction related, but this one caught my eye because it seemed to be a mixture of pre history, archaeology, astronomy and myths, all of which make me delve into them and want to explore their mysteries The genre here is unspecified The author himself says so at the preface It is neither about history nor about science The author s purpose has been merely to prompt us see these pre historic people known as Megalith Builders under some new light They were not primitive beings, but rather religious ones, great connoisseurs of the arts of maritime and navigation, as well as studious readers of the stars Somehow they have managed to interconnect all of these things and give us these magnificent monuments like Stonehenge and Newgrange This last sentence is, of course, a hypothesis Again, the author has made sure we understand this There are only a few tangible elements on which we can rely to prove certain theories when talking about things that might have happened thousands of years BC So yes, the book is full of hypotheses, but in addition to some logical explanations and deductions taken by writings of the Classical era or by myths, they hardly seem a coincidence I will not keep teasing you with tidbits here and there But I would like to talk to you about some technicalities For people like me, who haven t got any particular knowledge on, let s say astronomy or mathematics, this is a difficult book to keep up with I did rather well with the theoretical parts that explain the rituals, but I found myself reading a few paragraphsthan once to fully comprehend them Some would also claim that the manner of writing is artificial or stilted I didn t think so even though I did have the barrier of specialized language In a nutshell, it is due to my own limitations that I didn t fully enjoy this book, but it was a ride for which I have no regrets Many references were quite familiar, especially those concerning Jason and the Argonauts, as well as Hercules and one thing is for sureI will never see the constellations with the same eyes again EDIT concerning the Revised Edition of the bookThe author has been so kind as to send me a copy of the Revised Edition and I felt that the least I could do in return would be to make a few comments as to whether there has been an improvement or not I assure you that there has indeed been one My inadequacies on the subject matter and the specialized language are unchanged, but there have been some changes on the technical parts that have worked for the best The book is thicker, the font size is better, the figures, although still in black and white, are larger What has also filled me with joy is that the footnotes, which could be really distracting, have been replaced by endnotes found at the end of each chapter All these make the reading experience easier I appreciate that the author went into the trouble of improving his work I also appreciate that he sought opinions anew It shows a responsible and consistent personality Mr Vega has a vast knowledge on his field of work and this fact is apparent throughout the book I now recommend it without any inhibitions, as long as you make sure to get your hands on the Revised Edition The book explores a far reaching and highly researched original idea My main concern about the hypothesis proposed, which is dependent upon astronomical observations, is that often when I have visited sites likes Avebury and Stonehenge, it has been cloudy and or raining For the megalith builders it must have been frustrating, at least, to arrive after a multiyear journey at eg Avebury for a lunar standstill to find that it was bucketing down and that there was not a star to be seen Neverthele The book explores a far reaching and highly researched original idea My main concern about the hypothesis proposed, which is dependent upon astronomical observations, is that often when I have visited sites likes Avebury and Stonehenge, it has been cloudy and or raining For the megalith builders it must have been frustrating, at least, to arrive after a multiyear journey at eg Avebury for a lunar standstill to find that it was bucketing down and that there was not a star to be seen Nevertheless, I think contributions like this to understanding megalithic cultures are always welcome Since the hypothesis proposed cannot be proven, perhaps Dr Vega might consider building his theory into a novel I can see that that there are ingredients for an excellent tale to be told Former scientist and monk, Manuel Vega sheds new light upon prehistory, on the mystery that shrouds our ancestors the builders of megalithic monuments such as Stonehenge, Carnac, Avebury, Newgrange, Almendres or those at Orkney Islands He also exposes the information hidden in the classical myths like Jason and the Argonauts, Hyperborea or the Twelve Labors of Hercules, and even in the legends of Atlantis and King Arthur, discovering in the process the cosmic roots of Christianity and Western Civilization Sailors of Stonehenge contains than a hundred images and figuresManuel Vega has written an extraordinary book that turns history upside down Gavin Menzies, The Lost Empire of Atlantis Remarkably well constructed a trove of thoughtful information ND Wiseman, The Megalithic Portal Reads like a vivid narration of the adventure that marked the origins of Civilization Anna Ntinti, Classicist A superb work that anyone interested in the megalithic culture should read Manel Sancho, Old Civilizations Blog How come nobody thought of this before Dr Reinoud de Jonge, How the SunGod Reached America Strongly recommended Eric Sargeant, Leyhunters Newsletter First Reads Giveaway2 5As a college student, I ve had to read a lot of journal articles and books written by grad students and post grad doctorates And thus, I ve developed a radar that divides these books articles into two categories Category one are the ones that are genuinely easily accessible and interesting something I would read for fun even if it wasn t for class Category two are the ones that are overly technical and pedantic something to skim through so I can form enough of a vague First Reads Giveaway2 5As a college student, I ve had to read a lot of journal articles and books written by grad students and post grad doctorates And thus, I ve developed a radar that divides these books articles into two categories Category one are the ones that are genuinely easily accessible and interesting something I would read for fun even if it wasn t for class Category two are the ones that are overly technical and pedantic something to skim through so I can form enough of a vague idea to still do well on the final.Sailors of Stonehenge, unfortunately, is a category two.The back of the book claims that it s written in a simple and straightforward style I don t know whether to applaud the audacity of this lie or just be irritated One sentence on page 11 really stuck out at me due to its shear heaviness and awkwardness During the past 40 years, archeoastronomy has been able to establish itself as a respectable field of knowledge, in part due to the critical self evaluation that overcame the shortcomings of its pioneering works through serious statistical studies that confirmed, without any reasonable doubt, that a great part of the megalithic constructions were intentionally built according to celestial orientations Vega 11.It seems that when we re young, we write in overly simplified terms Stuff like, I woke up It was dark outside But then we spend our whole lives trying to get farther and farther away from being overly simplified, to the point where our sentences become a long, wordy mess If the sentence I quoted was written in a simple and straightforward style like the back of the book claimed, it would look a lotlike, During the past 40 years, archeoastronomy has established itself as a respectable field, in part due to serious statistical studies that overcame its pioneering works and confirmed that many megalithic constructions were intentionally built according to celestial orientations This sentence could probably be cleaned up even further and made evenreadily accessible if I changed some of the words instead of just trimming the fat.The above was just a micro example of the whole book, which contains way too many fillers like have been able to rather than just using active voice I also have mixed feelings about the footnotes Some were helpful Others weren t I feel like the author should be just decide if 1 The information is so important it should be just be in the book, or 2 The information is so not important that it gets banished to the back of the book Constantly forcing readers to break their flow of reading and look down at the footnotes gets irritating after awhile I did enjoy the figures and pictures, which helped camouflage how dry the book gets.Good non fiction or at least, non fiction that appeals to the masses grounds itself in narrative voice and appeals to what the reader already knows With something like prehistory and megaliths people don t know about it, I was expectingmyth debunking and imagery than what was in the book What the book does have are a lot of equally dry quotes and chapter summaries, which only makes it feellike a text book and less like a book I was reading on my own time.So what is good about this book As I mentioned above, the images and figures that are often worked into the text rather than just random eye relievers The topic itself Prehistory, ancient monuments and myths are going to be interesting regardless of how it s written And I do also appreciate all the research that went into this book It s just not the kind of writing I would recommend to other people I won this book through Goodreads First Reads Please see edit towards the bottom of this review for comments regarding the revised edition of this book The author kindly sent me an English copy of this book as well as the Spanish copy This review covers the English copy of the book as it would have taken me considerably longer to read the Spanish Edition.I wanted to enjoy this book so muchthan what I actually did I love history, and thought that I would get a lot out of the book To an I won this book through Goodreads First Reads Please see edit towards the bottom of this review for comments regarding the revised edition of this book The author kindly sent me an English copy of this book as well as the Spanish copy This review covers the English copy of the book as it would have taken me considerably longer to read the Spanish Edition.I wanted to enjoy this book so muchthan what I actually did I love history, and thought that I would get a lot out of the book To an extent I did The author had clearly put a lot of research into it, and I found some chapters absolutely fascinating I particularly enjoyed the chapter on Atlantis However, I found some chapters of the book went totally over my head This was not due to complex subject matter, but instead was due to the language used within the book I believe the translation process may have let the book down somewhat, though this isof a problem in the first portion of the book I found as I readof it that the language did improve a lot, either that or I just got used to it I see a revised issue is now becoming available so maybe this has been fixed the issue somewhat Another major problem I had was the figures and the footnotes Many of the figures referenced within the text were on different pages to where they were referenced This led to a very disrupted reading experience and I truly think that in most cases with some tweaking, this could be solved Also the footnotes weren t always helpful to me, and again interfered with the flow of the reading.Finally, I did love many of the figures, particularly the photos I feel though, that the book would really benefit from these having some colour added.Overall I did enjoy the book and found it absolutely fascinating, I just think that with improvements on the above it could be so much better.EDIT 12 11 2013The author has kindly sent me a copy of the revised edition of this book A great improvement has been made The book is now thicker and the paper is of a higher quality I have also noticed a great improvement in the language issues which I had originally mentioned above, and it is a much smoother reading experience now The pictures and figures are also much larger to in most places help solve the previous problems of them being too far away from the writing to go with them The pictures are still in black and white, which is a massive shame, however with all the other improvements it no longer matters quite as much as it did and would just be a nice bonus nowthan anything I also like the addition of the preface and about the author sections at the front of the book They just help add depth and aprofessional aspect to the book, which the previous edition was definitely lacking I consider the changes to be that great, that I am now changing my rating from this book from a 3 to a 4 I d just like to say thank you to the author for going to the efforts of improving this book as much as possible, and also thank you for sending me a revised edition so that I could see the vast improvements for myself.If you are considering reading this book, then you should definitely pick a copy up Just make sure you get the revised edition