The second half of the nineteenth century marks a watershed in human history Railroads linked remote hinterlands with cities overland and undersea cables connected distant continents New and accessible print technologies made the wide dissemination of ideas possible oceangoing steamers carried goods to faraway markets and enabled the greatest long distance migrations in recorded history In this volume, leading scholars of the Islamic world recount the enduring consequences these technological, economic, social, and cultural revolutions had on Muslim communities from North Africa to South Asia, the Indian Ocean, and China Drawing on a multiplicity of approaches and genres, from commodity history to biography to social network theory, the essays in Global Muslims in the Age of Steam and Print offer new and diverse perspectives on a transnational community in an era of global transformation A sorely needed volume on global connectivity, Islam, and methods of transmission networks Particularly well done of Gelvin Green to frame this in the context of greater trends of innovation and types of circulation A sorely needed volume on global connectivity, Islam, and methods of transmission networks Particularly well done of Gelvin Green to frame this in the context of greater trends of innovation and types of circulation