Climate change is profoundly altering our world in ways that pose major risks to human societies and natural systems We have entered the Climate Casino and are rolling the global warming dice, warns economist William Nordhaus But there is still time to turn around and walk back out of the casino, and in this essential book the author explains how Bringing together all the important issues surrounding the climate debate, Nordhaus describes the science, economics, and politics involved and the steps necessary to reduce the perils of global warming Using language accessible to any concerned citizen and taking care to present different points of view fairly, he discusses the problem from start to finish from the beginning, where warming originates in our personal energy use, to the end, where societies employ regulations or taxes or subsidies to slow the emissions of gases responsible for climate change Nordhaus offers a new analysis of why earlier policies, such as the Kyoto Protocol, failed to slow carbon dioxide emissions, how new approaches can succeed, and which policy tools will most effectively reduce emissions In short, he clarifies a defining problem of our times and lays out the next critical steps for slowing the trajectory of global warming I have a lot of issues with this book My biggest one is which country should we invade first to guarentee that they abide by proscribed CO2 emission standards.that is the logical conclusion, as even if the US quit emitting all CO2 tomorrow it would do little to correct the issue, and even sanctions would not be enough to prevent free riders. For those who actually want to change the world instead of just complaining about environmental politics.William Nordhaus takes a very objective approach to the science, economics and politics of climate change in a very easy to read way and good figures that illustrate the trends of our climate and impacts of human activity.This book is from 2013, and many developments have been made since then, including the Paris Climate Agreement which would come as a surprise for Nordhaus following his beli For those who actually want to change the world instead of just complaining about environmental politics.William Nordhaus takes a very objective approach to the science, economics and politics of climate change in a very easy to read way and good figures that illustrate the trends of our climate and impacts of human activity.This book is from 2013, and many developments have been made since then, including the Paris Climate Agreement which would come as a surprise for Nordhaus following his belief that uniting countries under such an agreement would be a very remote possibility though Trump might prove him right after all This makes the book feel a little bit outdated to read now, but for sure motivates me to keep an eye on hisrecent research in this field.Even being a 6 year old book, it still carries very important information trying to lead the reader through the cycle of anthropogenic global warming how we do it, what it does to the environment, what does the environment does to us in return, and what can we do to stop this.For those searchingabout the science around climate change, they will not find that knowledge in this book, and it s advised searching elsewhere An excellent book on Climate Change Not quite new but explains the economist view on Climate Change in a way accessible to an educated reader I am not 100% convinced on everything my priorities are higher on protecting ecosystems than optimizing the well being of other people But I highly appreciate the intellectual honesty of Nordhaus It is that kind of a book that creates the feeling where can I readon this. If you are already convinced that climate change is real and worry about it, this book is not for you, mostly It s for politicians There are some interesting data and details though. This book is enlighting because it is clear about the great danger of global warming but it is also rational and is not catastrophic on some aspects for example agriculture and health care I think the author is a little bit naive in the last chapters those about obstacles to climate change policies , because it seems he thinks it s easier than it is to change doubters mind and align countries policies for full participation in climate change policies Overall is a book that should be read to This book is enlighting because it is clear about the great danger of global warming but it is also rational and is not catastrophic on some aspects for example agriculture and health care I think the author is a little bit naive in the last chapters those about obstacles to climate change policies , because it seems he thinks it s easier than it is to change doubters mind and align countries policies for full participation in climate change policies Overall is a book that should be read to understand climate change I think Prof Nordhaus has given us a remarkable achievement a solid, sobering, stimulating, scientific, scary book on human caused global climate change, that leaves no room for doubt about the prospect that climate change deniers are going to sweat , like the rest of us, in coming decades.This is not a book about Apocalypse If anything, the Sterling Professor of Economics at Yale University writes with an even temper and drily matter of fact language that is a teensy bit annoying, given I think Prof Nordhaus has given us a remarkable achievement a solid, sobering, stimulating, scientific, scary book on human caused global climate change, that leaves no room for doubt about the prospect that climate change deniers are going to sweat , like the rest of us, in coming decades.This is not a book about Apocalypse If anything, the Sterling Professor of Economics at Yale University writes with an even temper and drily matter of fact language that is a teensy bit annoying, given the massively dangerous, initial impacts of climate change and global warming that are already unavoidable.I think the principal value of The Climate Casino is that Nordhaus lays out the economic cost benefit framework of policy considerations and possible remedial steps that the nations of the world, and mankind, can take to deal with the fact that we re putting too much carbon dioxide into the atmosphere In simplest terms, he says there are many things we can do to mitigate global warming.some arecostly than others and some are very expensive.some folks and some companies and some countries will have to payof the costs than others.I was surprised to read his conclusion that humans can likely survive the initial moderate impacts of global climate change warming without substantial social and economic disruption, if we start seriously working on it now there is a big pricetag, but we can tolerate it I mention, for the record, that Nordhaus carefully discusses the unpredictable, andthan trivially possible, catastrophic tipping points in climate disruption that might occur regardless of what we do or don t do think Dennis Quaid and The Day After Tomorrow.We re going to have to stop using coal around the world, or figure out how to burn it cleanly Andgenerally, we re going to have to figure out how to require companies and individuals to pay the true cost of burning fossil fuels, that is, the present and future cost of the damage those fuels cause to our environment and to our grandchildren s prospects for survival.It was remotely heartening to read Nordhaus estimate that we have a reasonable chance of dealing with global warming if we get the ball rolling now, and make sure everyone pays the price.This is the only planet our grandchildren will have to live on We must do the right thing for them.More reviews on my website I think this is a very solid intro to some of the challenges surrounding dealing with climate change, but it has some flaws The biggest issue with it is really just that it s not capable of changing minds, though Nordhaus is very upfront about that in the beginning But I think a bigger concern is just that it feels too abbreviated on the one hand, he covers all the major territory and brings in a lot of ideas, but too often particularly in areas involving skepticism about the science and ev I think this is a very solid intro to some of the challenges surrounding dealing with climate change, but it has some flaws The biggest issue with it is really just that it s not capable of changing minds, though Nordhaus is very upfront about that in the beginning But I think a bigger concern is just that it feels too abbreviated on the one hand, he covers all the major territory and brings in a lot of ideas, but too often particularly in areas involving skepticism about the science and everything to do with adaptation he glosses over some areas where a quick rebuttal would be better Obviously the other major issue is just that he s an economist and is in crazy love with carbon taxes, although after totally biffing on a section on transportation policy seriously, he gets it wrong in a bunch of different ways he ends up rounding out the chapter discussing how some of these non ideal policies might actually be a productive albeit flawed and insufficient way of going about things.I want this book to better because it s got a lot of good points to it I think it makes a lot of the best arguments of the Skeptical Environmentalist but put in aaccurate and realistic picture But the flaws really hurt its ability to change minds, even those who might beopen than the crazy conservative skeptics I feel like too often he s too close to his argument and doesn t realize where it needs to be madecompelling, and that s kind of the fault of an editor He also doesn t get the arguments around wildlife and ecosystem services right at all, which is a little frustrating Similarly, the behavioral econ was only touched upon, and I think that is the sort of discussion that can undermine his major policy desire carbon tax , so I wish maybe it had eeked through a bit.It s interesting to note that some people complained about the number of charts graphs because they are very simple and illustrative, and if you re interested in reading about this issue from an economist, you should obviously be capable of dealing with them And I think if you do have an open mind but want to thinkabout how one balances policy decisions in this area, this is definitely a book worth reading But I just don t know that it is going to change anything In The Climate Casino, economist William Nordhaus considers how we should respond to climate change according to economics.The first policy recommendation of the book is a carbon tax Climate change is caused by greenhouse gases, especially CO2, but no one pays for the consequences of putting carbon in the atmosphere as far as economics is concerned, it s an externality Nordhaus wants to impose a carbon tax to make fossil fuelsexpensive This should limit consumption and make alternative In The Climate Casino, economist William Nordhaus considers how we should respond to climate change according to economics.The first policy recommendation of the book is a carbon tax Climate change is caused by greenhouse gases, especially CO2, but no one pays for the consequences of putting carbon in the atmosphere as far as economics is concerned, it s an externality Nordhaus wants to impose a carbon tax to make fossil fuelsexpensive This should limit consumption and make alternative energyaffordable relative to fossil fuels.But the second idea here is that a tax would help us toaccurately assign value to the planet, ecosystems, forests, ocean currents, species, atmospheric temperatures, etc Nordhaus wants to tone down the emotional rhetoric and focus on the numbers If the Arctic melts, for example, but if we also produce economic growth relative to costs incurred by climate change, that s a win Northern countries like Canada, Denmark, Norway, the USA, and Russia are betting on that win now because the Arctic covers a lot of fossil fuels If forests are cut down and the species that rely on them for a habitat go extinct, that s a win so long as we assign those species low value relative to the profits of the lumber company There s a danger that people will perform the analysis Nordhaus does and conclude that they, at least, will come out ahead I suspect that these costs are almost always estimated too conservatively I am not a huge fan of this economic analysis, which is not to say I dismiss it entirely While I find Nordhaus s willingness as an economist to study climate change unusual and therefore admirable, it is disturbing to look at the planet in economic terms alone Fossil fuel extraction is very profitable, and it s not easy to imagine governments ever deciding to significantly reduce fossil fuel profits in order to save pretty much anything I further wonder about the economic framing Let s imagine rising sea levels threaten the lives of potentially millions of people If their homes are in an impoverished country, their loss doesn t count as much as the loss of a home of someone living in Miami because the global economy will not be affected as severely Am I being naive to point out that something important is missing in this analysis The discourse on this subject would be much easier if conservatives could get past obnoxious denial and recognize that Nordhaus has presented a conservative idea based on markets as opposed to a leftist idea limiting and regulation production Sigh But it s not as though liberals have leapt at every opportunity to act, even if I would expect things like adopting a vegetarian diet or driving a hybrid or electric car to correlate with liberal attitudes I note that Washington state voted down its carbon tax proposal Although Prime Minister Trudeau has made some noise about carbon tax, I rarely hear people cheering about it To some extent, I worry that George Monbiot is correct when he writes But the thought that worries me most is this As people in the rich countries even the professional classes begin to wake up to what the science is saying, climate change denial will look as stupid as Holocaust denial, or the insistence that AIDS can be cured with beetroot But our response will be to demand that the government acts, while hoping it doesn t We will wish our governments to pretend to act We get the moral satisfaction of saying what we know to be right, without the discomfort of doing it.Nordhaus s contribution here is to note that nobody really wants to give up a ton to deal with climate change A carbon tax is helpful because it forces people to put up the money to release carbon into the atmosphere But he acknowledges that, on the international stage, it has become a prisoner s dilemma Update David Roberts of Vox has convincingly argued that although liberals don t always leap at the chance to act, the only productive response to climate change in the liberal democracies has come from left leaning governments Finally, the overview of climate science is actually quite good one of the best I ve so far encountered in one of these climate change for a popular audience books Nordhaus goes over the greenhouse effect, tipping points, and geoengineering pretty standard But he also introduces, explains, and summarizes various climate models He explains what a model is, something these books far too rarely do given that models are responsible for our projections, and there are plenty of charts showing what these models reveal At the end of the day, I wouldn t recommend Climate Casino alone to readers looking to learn about climate change But I do recommend it With this rich book, the Nobel Laureate introduces the general public to the economics underlying the gravest threat confronting the world in the 21st century The informative and compelling narrative is easy to follow, and equips the reader with a useful set of tools to frame the threat and the policy challenge of climate change For the interested, technical reader, the author s academic papers and on line resources are cited for further study..Climate change deniers should be forced to read t With this rich book, the Nobel Laureate introduces the general public to the economics underlying the gravest threat confronting the world in the 21st century The informative and compelling narrative is easy to follow, and equips the reader with a useful set of tools to frame the threat and the policy challenge of climate change For the interested, technical reader, the author s academic papers and on line resources are cited for further study..Climate change deniers should be forced to read the book