L cole des femmes est une com die en cinq actes et en versLa com die de Moli reL cole des femmes i est consid r par les critiques pour tre parmi ses plus beaux travaux L histoire d un homme qui est tellement obs d par l infid lit f minine qu il projette d pouser sa jeune pupille na ve, qu il a form pour tre la femme parfaite, est un exemple classique du style comique de Moli re Four years in studying French and the French culture, yet I still cannot understand how they possibly can make such meaningless and boring books and plays And even movies Moliere, I feel, had something he wanted to say but did not know how to say it Or had nothing at all on his mind, so he made his thoughts up as he wrote It is such a shame that writers in his time wereworried about the sound, the cohesion, and the public acceptance of their worksthan the reason for writing somet Four years in studying French and the French culture, yet I still cannot understand how they possibly can make such meaningless and boring books and plays And even movies Moliere, I feel, had something he wanted to say but did not know how to say it Or had nothing at all on his mind, so he made his thoughts up as he wrote It is such a shame that writers in his time wereworried about the sound, the cohesion, and the public acceptance of their worksthan the reason for writing something His work is like a mute song you can hear the melody but it cannot say anything for the life of it We love Moli re for his flair and wit And laugh out loud while the rest just sit I saw L Ecole des Femmes performed at the Com die Fran aise in Paris two weeks ago in the company of a little group of women friends It was a hugely enjoyable experience for many reasons but mainly because we found the play so funny, laughingfrequently than the other patrons of the theatre who seemed to be a very sober lot indeed It helped that we d all looked over the play recently I had read half of it We love Moli re for his flair and wit And laugh out loud while the rest just sit I saw L Ecole des Femmes performed at the Com die Fran aise in Paris two weeks ago in the company of a little group of women friends It was a hugely enjoyable experience for many reasons but mainly because we found the play so funny, laughingfrequently than the other patrons of the theatre who seemed to be a very sober lot indeed It helped that we d all looked over the play recently I had read half of it, hoping to keep a little of the suspense intact and so we were able to follow the dialogue easily and knew where the funny bits were But I think we laughed as much at the wonderfully dramatic performances of the actors as at the lines themselves All the performers were engaging but the actor who played the main character, Arnolphe, and who is on stage practically the entire time, was superb Objectively viewed, the character of Arnolphe lurches between ridiculously comic and morally reprehensible but the actor who played him managed to engage our sympathy for his predicament in spite of our better judgement I finished reading the play today and was surprised to see that the ending of the original was slightly different to the staged version I had applauded Moli re s foresight and wisdom in granting the main female character, Agn s, a say in her own destiny in the final scene of the play However, I was a little previous with my applause It would seem that the director, Jacques Lassalle created a slightlynuanced ending while the original ending isin keeping with the times Agn s s destiny is decided entirely by the men in her family Moli re did give Agn s some great lines though, words which shine with perfect simplicity and truth but which are subtly clever as well Horace J en suis assez press par ma flame auseAgnes Quand je ne vous vois point, je ne suis point joyeuseHorace Hors de votre pr sence, on me voit triste aussiAgnes H las s il tait vrai, vous resteriez iciAgn s learns some harsh lessons at the Ecole des Femmes but she manages to turn them to her advantageoften than not For a character created in 1662, she sometimes sounds surprisingly modern Bravo, Moli re After reading this, it comes as a surprise that people in 17th century France did not conduct all their business in alexandrine rhyming couplets, it all seems to come so natural, like.Moli re, je t adore All rights reserved this is one of my own photos from a recent trek round Paris Truly a trek, on foot In silly shoes I am still paying the price After reading this, it comes as a surprise that people in 17th century France did not conduct all their business in alexandrine rhyming couplets, it all seems to come so natural, like.Moli re, je t adore All rights reserved this is one of my own photos from a recent trek round Paris Truly a trek, on foot In silly shoes I am still paying the price I didn t expect this to be so funny I listened to a wonderfully done dramatic reading, heard on librivox.org This rhyming play with wicked humor explores the double dealings and double standards of Arnolphe, an insecure man who contrives to show the world how to rig an infallible alliance by marrying his young ward, Agn s Arnolphe is obsessed with the fear of being made a cuckold so he has raised Agn s for 13 years in hopes to mold her to his liking Enter young Horace and what could go wrong wink wink I had never read Moliere before though he has been on my list for a long while but after reading Balzac s A Daughter of Eve with the passage below I had to read Moliere s The School of Wives Yet the vast majority of men who are not so old as Arnolphe, prefer a religious Agnes to a budding Celimene After reading this play I know about Arnolphe and his religious Agnes , trying to keep this innocent girl for a wife at all cost In Balzac s A Daughter of Eve , Angelique comes not from a conv I had never read Moliere before though he has been on my list for a long while but after reading Balzac s A Daughter of Eve with the passage below I had to read Moliere s The School of Wives Yet the vast majority of men who are not so old as Arnolphe, prefer a religious Agnes to a budding Celimene After reading this play I know about Arnolphe and his religious Agnes , trying to keep this innocent girl for a wife at all cost In Balzac s A Daughter of Eve , Angelique comes not from a convent but a home just the like Her older husband finds a similar circumstance in a younger man trying for his wife but though kind of familiar, quite different in the whole to this play but I understand what Balzac was saying.Moliere s play is a fun play that I can see all the humor which an audience would enjoy Though the females are viewed quite different in that epoch in times, I take that all for the times and just enjoy these insults to women in that perspective I have read I am thinking about both Henry James Watch and Ward and Edith Wharton s Summer , which have older men grooming younger girls so they can marry them, always a young man in the shadows I was looking up Moliere and found he was a bit like Arnolphe, see below from Wikipedia Moli re directed her education and she grew up under his eye Armande married Moli re in 1662, when he was 40 and she 17 Together, they had three children Louis 19 January 11 November 1664 , Marie Madeleine Esprit 3 August 1665 23 May 1723 and Pierre Jean Baptiste Armand 15 September 11 October 1672 The play in short Arnolphe wants not to be the dupe of a wife, so he finds a young girl to be brought up in a convent until he can marry her, he wants her stupid and not smart enough to fool him spoiler alert Arnolphe finds he has been duped nonetheless He is the fool in so many ways The story is slightly crazy and the twist at the end was unexpected But after reading two classics with all this flowery speech, where making it short means ten instead of twenty pages of explanations, I ll be glad to read something modern soon.The characters were nice, and I was quite amused by their actions, though things could have been prevented if they talked to each other properly So I think it s 3 5 stars L cole des femmes The School For Wives, MoliereThe School for Wives is a theatrical comedy written by the seventeenth century French playwright Moli re, and considered by some critics, to be one of his finest achievements It was first staged at the Palais Royal theatre, on 26 December 1662, for the brother of the King The play depicts a character, who is so intimidated by femininity that he resolves to marry his young, na ve ward and proceeds to make clumsy advances to this purpose Arnolph L cole des femmes The School For Wives, MoliereThe School for Wives is a theatrical comedy written by the seventeenth century French playwright Moli re, and considered by some critics, to be one of his finest achievements It was first staged at the Palais Royal theatre, on 26 December 1662, for the brother of the King The play depicts a character, who is so intimidated by femininity that he resolves to marry his young, na ve ward and proceeds to make clumsy advances to this purpose Arnolphe, the main protagonist, is a man of 42 years who has groomed the young Agn s since the age of 4 Arnolphe supports Agn s living in a nunnery until the age of 17, when he moves her to one of his abodes, which he keeps under the name of Monsieur de la Souche Arnolphe s intention is to bring up Agn s in such a manner that she will be too ignorant to be unfaithful to him and he becomes obsessed with avoiding this fate To this end, he forbids the nuns who are instructing her from teaching her anything that might lead her astray Right from the very first scene, Chrysalde warns Arnolphe of his downfall, but Arnolphe takes no heed 2014 1391 82 978964899064517 1662 As I read this play I couldn t help but draw comparisons between it and Shakespeare s The Taming of the Shrew Despite the fact that Moli re has been translated, I felt that his humour transcended not only the limits of translation, but that it also transcended the limits of time and spacesuccessfully than Shakespeare I know that some argue that Katherina s final monologue is intended to be ironic, but I have difficulty reading it as such it seems to be promoting a certain misogynism, an As I read this play I couldn t help but draw comparisons between it and Shakespeare s The Taming of the Shrew Despite the fact that Moli re has been translated, I felt that his humour transcended not only the limits of translation, but that it also transcended the limits of time and spacesuccessfully than Shakespeare I know that some argue that Katherina s final monologue is intended to be ironic, but I have difficulty reading it as such it seems to be promoting a certain misogynism, and it has allegedly always been problematic for audiences I do not have such difficulties with finding the irony in Moli re s The School for Wives Though so many of the Maxims for Marriage that Agn s recites in this work given to her by Arnolphe, under whose care she has been since the age of four are very similar to the points raised by Shakespeare s Katherina, it is clear from the beginning of this play that Arnolphe, who has been trying to raise Agn s into an obedient and ignorant wife, is a complete fool Mostly when we laugh in the play it is at Arnolphe s expense, for we recognize in him a frustrated and paranoid man who is not taken serious by his friends, his ward or even his servants the latter who argue over who will open the door for him until he threatens them with starvation He is a man who lacks respect and is forced to resort to brute force and threats to maintain even any semblance of authority which he so hungers for And yet, despite all of his scheming, Arnolphe is unable to make Agn s the submissive little bride of his desire He tells Agn s that it is a sin to have relations outside of marriage so that he can make her a respectable woman by making her his wife, but she instead uses his advice to plan a marriage to Horace, the young man with whom she has fallen in love in Arnolphe s absence Arnolphe, no matter how desperately he tries, is unable to stop the fates from intervening and cementing the love of Horace and Agn s This is a humorous and entertaining play to read today, almost four centuries later it is one of those works that I would love to see staged though I recognize fully that this either could grow my appreciation for the work or that it could leave me unfulfilled if it failed to live up to my expectations, the vision of the play that blossomed in my mind as the dialogue unfolded A shopkeeper at one of my favorite bookstores once said to me, I don t know how anyone can read plays I was purchasing some Brecht at the time Just go see it I explained to him then that so many classic plays just aren t staged very often Butthan this, as with reading a novel, I feel that there is something with using one s imagination when reading a play As with a film adaptation of a novel, a play that is staged may fall short of the vision that we develop in our minds when we read it And so not only because certain works are infrequently staged, but because reading a play offers a different creative experience than viewing it in a theatre not to mention we may lose certain things when they unfold at a different pace or in a different way , I enjoy reading plays, and so far I am finding particular delight in the plays of Moli re, which I will continue to explore throughout this year