Girl in White is the extraordinary story of the German expressionist painter Paula Modershohn Becker , told from the fictionalised perspective of her daughter, Mathilde Becker was a pioneer of modern art in Europe, but denounced as degenerate by the Nazis after her death Sue Hubbard draws on the artist s diaries and paintings to bring to life her intense relationship with the poet Rainer Maria Rilke, and her struggle to find a balance between being a painter, wife and mother Beautifully written and wholly knowledgeable Girl in White is a triumph of literary and artistic understanding, a tour de force masterly, moving Fay Weldon A writer of genuine talent Elaine Feinstein Sue Hubbard is a novelist, poet and art critic Her poem Eurydice is London s largest public art poem, at Waterloo She is a regular contributor to the Independent and the New Statesman, and runs Creative Writing workshops at the Royal College of Art


10 thoughts on “Girl in White

  1. Caroline Caroline says:

    This is a lovely slow burn of a book I usually read fiction quickly but like most poetry this book refused to be hurried It is rich with details about Paula Modersohn Becker and her life as an artist It feels at times like a series of paintings that you could step into and the locations of Paris and particularly Worpswede are vividly portrayed It also deals with the contemporary dilemmas of how as a woman you can make your way in the world as an artist and the competing demands of family and This is a lovely slow burn of a book I usually read fiction quickly but like most poetry this book refused to be hurried It is rich with details about Paula Modersohn Becker and her life as an artist It feels at times like a series of paintings that you could step into and the locations of Paris and particularly Worpswede are vividly portrayed It also deals with the contemporary dilemmas of how as a woman you can make your way in the world as an artist and the competing demands of family and duty are ever present The voices in the book alternate between that of Mathilde, Paula s daughter in a fictionalised form and Paula, who died shortly after her daughter was born Sue Hubbard manages to pull off the trick of making it seem as though their stories are unfolding in the present as you read, rather than in the past Clearly the book is underpinned by an immense amount of research but you don t feel the weight of it in the writing.As the John Berger quote on the back cover says it is a haunting book