The revolutionary writer and literary critic Lu Xun Zhou Shuren, is celebrated at home and abroad as one of the most groundbreaking and influential writers of modern China A first hand witness to China s social and political upheaval in the first half of the th century, he is remembered not only for his astute polemical essays and political articles but also for the short stories which explore the effects of contemporary social and cultural issues on the Chinese psycheThe stories in this collection are based on thecompilation Lu Xun Xiao Shuo Ji, originally published in two collections, Call to Armsand At the CrossroadsThe ten stories included are Kuang ren riji A Madman s Diary , Kong Yi Ji Kong Yiji , Yao Medicine , Mingtian Tomorrow , Yi jian xiao shi An Incident , Toufa de gushi A Story of Hair , Fengbo Storm in a Teacup , Guxiang My Old Home , Zhufu New Year Sacrifice , and Zai jiulou shang In the RestaurantTargeted specifically for students of Chinese, the book is conveniently organized with the original Chinese text on the left hand page and supplementary English explanations and Romanized spelling pinyin of difficult vocabulary, idiomatic expressions, and other phrases on the right with than , total While literary and cultural treasures in themselves, Lu Xun s works have been largely inaccessible to students of Chinese, who often find themselves forced to constantly consult a dictionary while frequently missing important nuances in the text This edition aims to eliminate such tedious and inefficient approaches to Lu Xun, while allowing students to appreciate these wonderful stories in the original Chinese


10 thoughts on “Lu Xun Xiao Shuo Ji Vocabulary: Selected Short Stories of Lu Xun

  1. Dylan Suher Dylan Suher says:

    Reading these in the original for the first time, I am amazed by what a different impression they ve made on me, and I m not sure whether it s because of poor quality translation, because of the inability of translation to capture Lu Xun s skill with language, or because my tastes have simply changed It probably varies from story to story I know the translation of A Madman s Diary didn t capture the oppressive paranoia of the Chinese, but I m not sure what translation has to do with the pain Reading these in the original for the first time, I am amazed by what a different impression they ve made on me, and I m not sure whether it s because of poor quality translation, because of the inability of translation to capture Lu Xun s skill with language, or because my tastes have simply changed It probably varies from story to story I know the translation of A Madman s Diary didn t capture the oppressive paranoia of the Chinese, but I m not sure what translation has to do with the painful ironies and marvelous plotting of Medicine and Tomorrow