Fortress Presss Foundations for Learning series prepares students for academic success through compelling resources that kick start their educational journey into professional Christian ministryIn Exploring Theology, Elaine A Robinson introduces readers to the study of theology as a central task of all Christians and one that deserves careful and consistent attention Following a lively examination of what theology is and how we do it, Robinson provides a basic map of the major doctrines of the faith and asks readers to consider their own beliefs at this important point in their journey She invites readers to think of theology as a stream into which we enter and which carries us deeper into the vast ocean which is the fullness of GodDesigned for those who are beginning a serious study of theology, Exploring Theology helps readers navigate what might, at first glance, appear as a confusing or abstract subject Navigational aids include an introduction to theological vocabulary, the sources and methods of theology, and tips for reading primary sources as a spiritual discipline As a result of this journey, readers will be excited to delve deeply into theology and will recognize the many ways that theology shapes how we live out the Christian faith in the world


10 thoughts on “Exploring Theology

  1. Jeremy Garber Jeremy Garber says:

    Robinson, professor of Methodist studies at St Paul School of Theology at Oklahoma City, provides an accessible and readable introduction to the practice and history of Christian theology Robinson chooses the second person to address the reader throughout, an unusual strategy sure to engage introductory ministerial students Robinson stresses the role of critical but not aggressive thinking in theology throughout the history of the church, highlighting the importance of deliberative theology Robinson, professor of Methodist studies at St Paul School of Theology at Oklahoma City, provides an accessible and readable introduction to the practice and history of Christian theology Robinson chooses the second person to address the reader throughout, an unusual strategy sure to engage introductory ministerial students Robinson stresses the role of critical but not aggressive thinking in theology throughout the history of the church, highlighting the importance of deliberative theology about our embedded theology She outlines the major periods in history where theology was developed to address conflicts both within and from without the Christian church pre Constantinian, the medieval period, the Reformation, and modernism, to name the primary ones She also looks at theological method, sources and norms, and provides exercises throughout for students to critically examine their own sources and norms Finally, she uses the Apostle s Creed to illustrate the usual loci of systematic theology a lovely and specific choice.That Robinson directly addresses new students preparing for Christian ministry are undoubtedly Robinson s target audience, which highlights both the strength and limitations of this slim volume Her imaginary conversation partner throughout is an eager seminarian with a history of church participation in a specific denomination, ready to enter into parish ministry within that denomination That student would be excellently served by this volume Non denominational students, non Christian students, or theological students with goals other than parish ministry will find the book s tone less helpful and may need to explore its contents elsewhere