The Caldecott medal winning d Aulaires once again captivate their young audience with this beautifully illustrated introduction to Norse legends, telling stories of Odin the All father, Thor the Thunder god and the theft of his hammer, Loki the mischievous god of the Jotun Race, and Ragnarokk, the destiny of the gods Children meet Bragi, the god of poetry, and the famous Valkyrie maidens, among other gods, goddesses, heroes, and giants Illustrations throughout depict the wondrous other world of Norse folklore and its fantastical Northern landscape


10 thoughts on “D'Aulaires' Book of Norse Myths

  1. Brad Brad says:

    The English ABCs of


  2. Richard Derus Richard Derus says:

    Well loved books from my pastRating 4 of fiveIngri and Edgar Parin d Aulaire were a married couple of Euro origin, he Swiss and she Norwegian, who came to the US in the 1920s to pursue fame and fortune Edgar was an illustrator for books, magazines, and the like, while Ingri painted rich guys portraits Came the Depression, oh dearie meeverything got harderso the two collaborated on writing and illustrating kids books together For forty plus years, the couple turned out beautiful, bea Well loved books from my pastRating 4 of fiveIngri and Edgar Parin d Aulaire were a married couple of Euro origin, he Swiss and she Norwegian, who came to the US in the 1920s to pursue fame and fortune Edgar was an illustrator for books, magazines, and the like, while Ingri painted rich guys portraits Came the Depression, oh dearie meeverything got harderso the two collaborated on writing and illustrating kids books together For forty plus years, the couple turned out beautiful, beautiful books.This book, published in 1967, was a gift from my dad to me I haven t got a lot of fond memories of my parents, and oddly most of them center around books in one shape or another This is no exception Dad read the book to me, even though by 1967 I was reading on my own, and we both loved the experience He s a hambone and a half, my dad, funny and quick and full of wordplay This book launched him on trajectories of mythmashing that, had I known then what I know now, I d ve written down or memorized or tape recorded or something He was abso bloody lutely riotous doing Odin as a doddering old fuffertut and Thor as a lisping faggot my sides are already hurting remembering the way that made me laughstill does and the Valkyries as whining misery guts.P.C he was, and is, not.The last time we spoke on the phone, before deafness and vascular dementia made it pointless to speak at all, I reminded Dad of this book He laughed like he had when he was 40 He lit up as he did the voices again It was a good last conversation to have with him, and it s all down to being a great big kid as he always was, and appreciating his kidliness left me feeling a lot less angry for his adult failings.So this book holds my special and dear gratitude for being a bridge to a man I never loved, but always felt impatient with and annoyed by and hurt by Books are magic, and myths are real, and don t ever, ever, ever forget that


  3. Deborah Markus Deborah Markus says:

    UPDATE I m pretty sure I wrote this review around the time the awesome Loki movies started being released Way too much focus on his boring blond brother in those, am I right It took me a long time to come around to the idea that the Norse myths could be compelling Even dating a guy who was crazy about them didn t help They just seemed so solemn and manly, especially compared to the Greek gods I could imagine falling into their world But the Norse names were weird, and the women were utte UPDATE I m pretty sure I wrote this review around the time the awesome Loki movies started being released Way too much focus on his boring blond brother in those, am I right It took me a long time to come around to the idea that the Norse myths could be compelling Even dating a guy who was crazy about them didn t help They just seemed so solemn and manly, especially compared to the Greek gods I could imagine falling into their world But the Norse names were weird, and the women were utterly unmemorable Okay, except for Hel Now I can see the appeal I especially appreciate the poignancy of gods who know their days are numbered Ragnar k is a brilliantly devastating idea Oh, and the world tree with a dragon gnawing at its roots I read this D Aulaires book with my son, but I m going to find another collection and read it on my own if he s not interested in going along for the ride Turns out those Norse myths are pretty cool


  4. Melanti Melanti says:

    Enjoyable, but a bit dry Lovely illustrations.However, I probably would have enjoyed it a bitif I hadn t read it right after reading Gaiman s Norse Mythology since itor less retells the same tales.


  5. Petergiaquinta Petergiaquinta says:

    Hey, Mighty Thor fans You might want to brush up on your Norse mythology before Ragnarok comes to your local theatre, and there s no better way to do that than by rereading the D Aulaires Book of Norse Myths.I read it as a child albeit with a slightly different title back then , checking it out from my public library, and I just reread it now in the edition my brother gave my daughter years ago with the new preface by Michael Chabon.And like Chabon, who also read it as a child back in the 60 Hey, Mighty Thor fans You might want to brush up on your Norse mythology before Ragnarok comes to your local theatre, and there s no better way to do that than by rereading the D Aulaires Book of Norse Myths.I read it as a child albeit with a slightly different title back then , checking it out from my public library, and I just reread it now in the edition my brother gave my daughter years ago with the new preface by Michael Chabon.And like Chabon, who also read it as a child back in the 60s, these stories and the art by the D Aulaires at once grandiose and goofy, writes Chabon have stuck with me over the decades the cosmic cow who licks all creation into being, Odin trading his eye for a drink from the Well of Wisdom, Thor s cart pulled by those two angry goats, the death of Balder, Thor disguised in Freya s wedding dress, and Loki s terrible revenge.The stories by those sissies of sunlight and air, the Greeks, are far better known and perhaps better told, but these stories, the northern stories of ice and fire, are far better stories themselves, much sadder, and far funnier than anything the Greeks ever wrote Tolkien, GRR Martin, and Neil Gaiman all draw from the Norse tradition And the Greeks have no one in their stories quite like Loki, who Chabon singles out for great praise Ally and enemy, genius and failure delightful and despicable, ridiculous and deadly, beautiful and hideous, hilarious and bitter, clever and foolish, Loki is the God of Nothing in Particular yet unmistakably of the ambiguous World Itself And if the Greeks have no Loki, neither do they have a Ragnarok, which I remember as a child was a word of great power Jesus might die, something to recall on this Good Friday as I tap away here on my cell phone, but three days later he s feeling much better, up and about, taking a walk in the Garden and punking poor cynical Thomas But Thor and Odin When they die, they die for good, just like the rest of us miserable bastards And they know it, too, which makes them and their stories just a littlepoignant for the reader, both for Michael Chabon and for me as a child, back in the 60s and again today forty some years later.Here s my review of Neil Gaiman s recent take on these same myths


  6. Sesana Sesana says:

    Years ago, I got a copy of


  7. RE de Leon RE de Leon says:

    d Aulaires Book of Norse Myths has the distinction of being the first book I ever bought with the next generation specifically in mind. I was trawlingone day and suddenly recalled a moment when I was ten years old, and I discovered a storybook of Norse myths I recalled Thor with his eight legged horse, and odin with his patched up eye and the rainbow bridge to Asgard.And then I decided I wanted my kids to also have that experience, especially if I have a daughter I suppose that s bec d Aulaires Book of Norse Myths has the distinction of being the first book I ever bought with the next generation specifically in mind. I was trawlingone day and suddenly recalled a moment when I was ten years old, and I discovered a storybook of Norse myths I recalled Thor with his eight legged horse, and odin with his patched up eye and the rainbow bridge to Asgard.And then I decided I wanted my kids to also have that experience, especially if I have a daughter I suppose that s because I think little boys will find strange adventure whether you hand it to them in a book or not And of course, among books of Norse Myth, d Aulaire s comes highly recommended, having been a favorite for generations I haven t finished it, since I m only glancing at it occasionally, on cold nights when I most feel the need for storymead But the experience is always one of returning to the wonder of being ten again, and discovering Northern myths for the first time The artwork, lovingly crafted, adds much to the experience.If only we had similar volumes available for Tagalog, Visayan, Ilocano, and Cordilleran mythsoh wait, I m already working on that Sorta Dd Aulaires Book of Norse Myths lives up to its reputation as perhaps the best introduction a child can have to the myths of Asgard and the other worlds of Nordic myths And I certainly recommend the book as a sound investment, both for your own edification, and for the enjoyment of your own next generation of readers RE de Leon2.30 PMDecember 30, 2010Agoo, La Union


  8. Katy Katy says:

    First off this is a physically beautiful book Both the illustrations and the actual paper that the book is printed on This is a children s book and as such is a wonderful quick introduction to Norse Myths without too much violence One I will be saving to read to children And for me a great introduction to get me interested in learningof these myths.


  9. Rachel Rachel says:

    I loved the illustrations and the feel of the pages of this novel Beautiful.


  10. Gina Anne Gina Anne says:

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here So hard to keep all these names straight But these gods and creatures were all so selfish and self centered that it s no wonder they brought an end to the world I now know so muchabout the myths that I ve only heard mention of over the years Thor, Odin, Freya, Valhalla and the Valkyries, and Ragnarokk But there were dozens of others that just slipped out of my mind because they were so confusing The book ends with a new world, a rebirth, and a pair of humans who believe not in the Ae So hard to keep all these names straight But these gods and creatures were all so selfish and self centered that it s no wonder they brought an end to the world I now know so muchabout the myths that I ve only heard mention of over the years Thor, Odin, Freya, Valhalla and the Valkyries, and Ragnarokk But there were dozens of others that just slipped out of my mind because they were so confusing The book ends with a new world, a rebirth, and a pair of humans who believe not in the Aesir gods but rather in the god of everything and it reminded me of what is happening now, how we are perhaps worshipping the wrong gods, how we might need to pull back and get another perspective The Ragnarokk description is eerily like the past few weeks or months the gods selfish and fighting and boastful and vengeful like Trump and other world leaders who think they re gods but who in fact are destroying the world and humanity