How did Asho end up as Lord Kyferin s squire Escape from Bythos leads seamlessly into the novel The Path of Flames sample chapters included at back of this novella , detailing how Asho acquired his freedom against all odds and escaped the slave city of Bythos All Ennoian knights must sacrifice a single year of their lives to garrison the subterranean city of Bythos Known as their Black Year, it is a time both loathed and dreaded Lord Kyferin, the infamous leader of the Black Wolves, is down in the depths with six of his knights Biding his time Whoring Dreaming of bloody invasions he ll launch when he is free to return to EnnoiaThen a Bythian slave brings word of dangerous prey A legendary monster A cavekiller Kyferin chooses to mount a hunt, taking a fraction of the men needed so as to increase his glory This cavekiller, however, is different More lethal Ferocious And the Bythian slave that Kyferin brings as a guide is none other than Asho s father This was a fantastic short introduction to Asho, Lord Kyferin, and the background elements that lead into the Chronicles of the Black Gate As always, Noah Michael Levine s performance was amazing. This prequel to the Chronicles of the Black Gate series fulfills everything one could want from such a story It is richly suspenseful, hints at lots of interesting possibilities to come while introducing a world and characters that I look forward to learningabout in the near future This is my first time reading something by this author and I can t wait to do so again Escape from BythosBy Phil TuckerNarrated by Noah Michael LevineSeries Chronicles of the Black Gate, Book 0.5This is a short story about morals, courage, right and wrong, slave and master, a cave dwelling monster, and fate It is short but has a lot thrown in there It has all this andThe narrator has the perfect voice for this story This short story was my introduction to the Black Gate Chronicles, and has really set me up for, what promises to be, a very interesting and exciting series Although the book starts and ends with the children, Asho and Shaya, it is their father Zekko who is the main protagonist and hero of the story Zekko is a slave, as will his children, and their children always be Always in servitude and calling other men master That is the way of things, as decreed by the Ascendant But now with his ch This short story was my introduction to the Black Gate Chronicles, and has really set me up for, what promises to be, a very interesting and exciting series Although the book starts and ends with the children, Asho and Shaya, it is their father Zekko who is the main protagonist and hero of the story Zekko is a slave, as will his children, and their children always be Always in servitude and calling other men master That is the way of things, as decreed by the Ascendant But now with his children about to be sent away to an indentured life of hell, he starts to have doubts, and to entertain thoughts of revolution against the Ennoian masters His children discovering a dangerous cavekiller in the mines, provides him with a strategem to test the will of the Ascendant, to see whether revolution is the right thing to do The Ennoians have a duty to protect their slaves from outside threats If they respond, as is their duty, if they fulfil their spiritual contract and kill the monster, then then it is a sign that Ascendancy is coherent, that it works, that all is as it is meant to be Zekko leads the Ennoian Black Wolves, a crack company of soldiers led by Lord Enderl Kyferin, into the mines to slaughter the beast Kyferin is an arrogant war hero, who fears nothing and treats slaves with the contempt he believes they deserve Zekko finds him brutal, cruel, selfish and practically inhuman and a clear sign that the Ennoians deserve to be overthrown However, the hunt does not turn out the way either man would have expected, and both Zekko and Kyferin are compelled to revise their opinions of each other, and their places in the world This story looks at the true meaning of bravery in the face of suicidal odds, and in the face of confronting ingrained customs and religious imperatives It also looks at bigotry on the sides of both oppressors and the oppressed Can a slaver ever be a good man I am really looking forward now to getting into the series proper